folding numbers

folding numbers


Folding numbers is a little game, I invented while writing the Otaon chapter.

This is how it works.

You have a number with more than one digit, say 12. You can fold 12 by adding up the single numbers. In this case 1+2. So 12 folds to three.

Now, take a birthday date: 15 August 1978. It’s the birthday of a main character who hasn’t entered the story yet, though I couldn’t resist to give that character a tiny scene in book 2.

So, let’s see how this birthday folds.

15 folds to 6, 8 for the month is already single digit, 19 folds to ten which folds to 1, 78 folds to fifteen, which folds to six. And the sum of all folds is 6+8+1+6 which equals 21, which folds to three.

Now that’s just one way to fold a birthday. Let’s try another one. In this case we add up each number involved: 1+5+8+1+9+7+8 = 39. Thirty-nine folds to twelve, which again folds to three.

Nine is the most exceptional folding number I have discovered so far, because it folds back to nine for ages. In fact, I haven’t reached the end yet. See here

18 folds to 9

27 /) 9

36 /) 9

45 /) 9

54 /) 9

63 /) 9

72 /) 9

81 /) 9

90 /) 9

and now it gets funny 99 folds to 18 which folds to 9.

108 /) 9

117 /) 9

126 /) 9

135 /) 9

144 /) 9

153 /) 9

162 /) 9

171 /) 9

180 /) 9

and again, 189 folds to 18 which folds to nine.

And 198 folds to 18 which folds to nine

207 /) 9

216 /) 9

225 /) 9

234 /) 9

243 /) 9

and now I have to get back to work /-) (this is my smily, untampered by bloody emojis — and with a hat).